You are here: HOME > Feature Topics

Feature Topics

Japan: a global powerhouse for sport technology

Japan: a global powerhouse for sport technology

NEW  August 5, 2016)

During the games, athletes compete against one another, staying true to the Games’ motto “faster, higher, stronger” (which comes from Latin “citius, altius, fortius”). Although it may not be evident to most viewers, there is also intense competition between different technologies at the games: equipment, athletic gear, arena facilities, and measuring/timing devices, all of which has been developed in order to augment athletes’ performances.
In addition, other brand-new non-sports technologies are introduced for the benefit of audiences, both on the television and for those present at the arenas, and to aid organization and logistics at the games.

Japanese technologies have significantly contributed to many of the Olympic Games. Although the 2016 Summer Olympics have just begun, new technologies developed in Japan and intended for use at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo have already been announced: while some of these are still in development and have only been demonstrated, others have already been released on a commercial basis.

In this article, we introduce interesting and unique Japanese technologies that play an important role in the Olympic Games.

© Japanest NIPPON

Pulses: Tiny Grains with Huge Value — 2016 International Year of Pulses

Pulses: Tiny Grains with Huge Value — 2016 International Year of Pulses

(May 23, 2016)
Pulses may seem like tiny grains, and indvarious pulseseed they are. We may view pulses as merely a plant or food. However, pulses are an integral part of the Earth’s ecosystems. Their roots spread under the ground and make the soil rich. They grow along with nature without harming the environment, in whatever habitat. Their harvest is an important food source for humans. The year 2016 is declared by the United Nations to be the International Year of Pulses (IYP). In order to raise public consciousness and increase production and trade, various pulse-themed activities will be implemented around the world.

© Japanest NIPPON

Top Global University Project

Top Global University Project

On September 26, 2014, the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology selected target schools for its Top Global University Project. This project supports decisive action toward globalization through college-wide innovation at universities, such as initiatives to effect international standards in the organization and structure of the university, hire more non-Japanese instructors, recruit more international students, and promote an international outlook among Japanese students.

Take the Challenge: Test Yourself Against a Top-rated Japanese University

Take the Challenge: Test Yourself Against a Top-rated Japanese University (Academic year 2013)

In Japan, university entrance is based largely on the scores that an applicant achieves in paper based tests administrated by the university he or she hopes to enter.
Prestigious universities require a high degree of subject to the applicants.

We introduce the entrance examination of The university of Tokyo, Kyoto University and Osaka University. These universities are known for top-rated universities and produced Nobel Laureates and other notable figures.

It opens the gate to such careers for Japanese young people to pass “the difficulty” of these examination required by the universities.

iPS Cells: the Driving Force of Regenerative Medicine Research

iPS Cells: the Driving Force of Regenerative Medicine Research

In 2007, Dr. Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University became the first in the world to succeed in generating human induced pluripotent stem cells, or human iPS cells. His discovery is set to revolutionize medical care around the world.
Since then, stem cell and regenerative medicine research, already areas of fierce international competition, has become almost cutthroat.

Japan already boasts an impressive portfolio of world-leading research results from a number of research institutes working in the field, not least the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application at Kyoto University. However, if the field is to begin to produce output that will help to improve the lives of the global population, it needs more money and more researchers. Regenerative medicine research in Japan is leading the rest of the international research community, but it requires the support of the entire nation if it is to continue to remain in ascendency.

World Premier International Research Center (WPI) Initiative – A Program to Attract the World’s Brilliant Minds to Japan

World Premier International Research Center (WPI) Initiative – A Program to Attract the World’s Brilliant Minds to Japan

The goals of the World Premier International Research Center (WPI) Initiative are to build a research environment that attracts researchers from around the world and to establish research centers that act as international knowledge hubs, based on Japan’s strength, and the brilliance of its researchers in science and technology.

Since 2007, under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan has been dedicated to establishing and supporting world-class research centers.

In 2012, Professor Shinya Yamanaka of the Institute of Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, a WPI research center, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

This article presents a general overview and the goals of the WPI program, which is already starting to show success.

Discoveries and Developments: How Japan Changed the World

Discoveries and Developments: How Japan Changed the World (archive)

Volume 7: Hideo Ohno "Development of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors"
Volume 6: Seiji Ogawa ”Discovery of BOLD Contrast, the Fundamental Principle of fMRI”
Volume 5: Shinya Yamanaka "The Study of iPS Cells"
Volume 4: Sumio Iijima "The discovery of carbon nanotubes and of the structural fluctuation of ultrafine gold particles"
Volume 3: Shizuo Akira "Toll-like receptors and innate immunity research"
Volume 2: Susumu Kitagawa "Pioneering Studies on New Porous Metal Complexes—Porous Coordination Polymers"
Volume 1: Isamu Akasaki "Establishing the Basic Technology for Blue Light-Emitting Diodes using Gallium Nitride"

Entrance Examination of Nagoya University — Take the Challenge: Test Yourself Against a Top-rated Japanese University

Read the article

We introduce the entrance examination of Nagoya University, one of the top research institutions of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Engineering, and Medicine in Japan. It will be run in a three-part series: physics first, mathematics second, and chemistry third.
So, why don’t you try it?